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09 July 2013

GOOD POLICE, BAD COPS

Keep in mind that I'm a white man, an Engineer, a businessman and present a reasonable appearance.  I can only imagine what it's like for dark-skinned or otherwise 'different' people who are zeroed in on by the cops.

This post is a result of my extreme anger at all the dogs being shot dead by cops all over the country because the dogs barked at them or approached them to check them out, as dogs will do with strangers; and this includes dogs in their own yards and a thirteen year old Cocker Spaniel and dogs in their own homes, often during police raids at the wrong addresses.  Much of my Facebook page is dedicated to the abuse and welfare of animals, domestic or wild, and I read accounts, every day, about cops unnecessarily shooting dogs who were running away or being friendly, barking a warning to leave their territory and other "dangerous, aggressive" behaviors.

I was going to write a post about the need for us all to have our city and county police to be properly trained to use non-lethal methods to restrain or, better yet, avoid the same dogs that postmen manage to pass, every day, without having to shoot them.   The majority of these cops are clearly at fault and it's often recorded on home or smart phone videos as such, but their superiors always claim that their boys acted on protocol.   Too often, these  Barney Fifes are let off with no punishment or charges of animal abuse, which is what they are guilty of doing.


Instead, after posting this, I'm going to post an article by a freelance writer, with her permission, that does justice to the issue and is well written and covers everything I wanted to say.  It'll be entitled

Stop the Bleeding: An open letter to police on the shooting of pets





Below, is my contribution:

Over the years, if I've seen a lone cop or one who somehow seemed "lost," I often asked if he/she required assistance.  I was reminded of this, yesterday, when I saw a police car off in a field with its bubble gum lights on and no cop in sight.  I didn't stop at the time, but, on my way back by there some fifteen minutes later, the lights had been turned off and I asked the fellow collecting donations for the homeless if he knew about the cop.  As it turned out, the cop had been talking to the collector fellow at some point and was okay.    It was a crappy intersection to try to make a U-turn to get to that field, but I was planning to do so should his lights still be on and I hadn't been assured by the donation collector that the cop was all right.

Whether we are armed or not, it's a moral duty for all of us to query people if we think they might need help and that includes anyone in uniform.  I stop in the middle of traffic or pull off the road, depending, to help accident victims and even animals, wild or domestic, that are injured.  i do what I can until the EMTs, animal control or police arrive.

[My now oldest cat was in the middle of one of our busiest roads, a five-week old kittten at the time, and I nearly ran over her, myself, thinking she was a sock, until she moved.  I suspect someone dumped her there to get rid of her.  Fortunately, there was no traffic very close behind me and she sat waiting for me; didn't run off.  I tossed her in my truck and she's almost a constant companion, now, about five years old, greets me whenever I come home and often cuddles next to me.]

This does not change my opinion about the bully cops I've run into over the years,  or the ones who are too trigger happy to be given guns and badges, or the ones who shoot dogs and unarmed people instead of being properly trained and quick thinking enough to use non-lethal methods, of course.   Those Barney Fifes shouldn't even be given the one bullet for their shirt pockets, much less a fully loaded automatic weapon.

Many of these should be re-evaluated for their positions and, if deemed necessary, given anger management or other psychological evaluations to determine if they, in fact, should even be on the police force, much less carrying lethal weapons.  It's the responsibility of our city officials and their police chiefs to weed out what I still refer to as Bully Cops, but are quite possibly downright dangerous cops.

On some occasions, when I, myself, needed police assistance, I was given exactly that and usually with friendliness or at least respect for a citizen.  I'd like to think the majority of them are honest and respectful and knowledgable of the law, but I know there are many who don't know the law as well as they think they do,  ignore it or make it up as they go, and that's  why we, as citizens, should know our own state laws should we be accosted for no apparent reason.  Carry a copy of some appropriate statutes with you, if you think it necessary .  I know of one expert concealed carry lawyer who always carried that particular statute with him in case he had to educate a cop about it.

One may still end up in jail, but very likely be released soon after they discover their error and they may even apologize for the inconvenience.


[There was recently written a wonderful article, which I'll also try to post here, which has some wonderful suggestions for dealing with cops and staying out of jail or soon getting out because of a false arrest.]

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